NDN Blog

Simon Rosenberg on Al Gore in the Financial Times

Simon was quoted in today's Financial Times article "Oscars Add Lustre to the Idea of a Gore Candidacy:"

“If you go to the west coast the big issue is not Iraq – as it is in Washington – but global warming,” said Simon Rosenberg, the head of the New Democratic Network, in Washington. “The Oscar ­ceremonies offered the spectacle of an exuberant repudiation of the Bush years. It is hard to think of a better platform for Mr Gore’s public profile.”

The challenge of our times

I sent this out to our members today.  Thoughts, as always, are welcome.

The challenge of our times

When I look back at what progressivism accomplished in the 20th century, I feel a tremendous sense of pride. 

Consider what our movement and its leaders accomplished.  Abroad, we defeated fascism, were instrumental in the triumph over communist totalitarianism, and constructed an international system based on FDR’s vision of a United Nations, bringing unprecedented liberty and prosperity to the people of the world.  At home, we rescued America from its greatest economic crisis, the depression, created Social Security and Medicare, and spearheaded the civil rights, consumer, labor, women’s and environmental movements that have helped make America not just great, but good.  And when last in power, progressives oversaw the greatest economic expansion in our history.

Our challenge today, as the heirs to that inspiring legacy, is to build a 21st Century progressivism as great, and as good, as the progressivism of the century just passed.  At NDN, we believe that to replicate this 20th century success in our new century, our movement and its leaders must understand and master the three transformations that are creating an emergent, “new politics” of the 21st century.  To succeed today we must:

  1. Offer a governing agenda that tackles the challenges of our time. 

  2. Excel at using the new media and technology tools that are changing the way the people of the world communicate with one another. 

  3. Speak to, and engage, the new and more complex American population, so different today than when the last durable majority coalition was built 70 years ago. 

Helping progressives forge this new agenda, master these new communications tools and speak to the new people of America is what NDN and its network across the country is all about.  Together, we are imagining and building a 21st century progressivism, a progressivism that can be as visionary, strong and successful as the movement that did so much for so many in the 20th century. 

In the coming weeks I will be laying out, in detail, the specifics of what NDN is doing to help progressives build this modern movement.  I hope you will find our vision, our strategy, our team, and our network compelling, and that you will once again join us in our important work.  I know of no more important work we could be doing, and no group of people better equipped to get it done. 

Thank you.

Joe Garcia Elected Chairman of the Miami-Dade Democratic Party

Our own Joe Garcia, a longtime political leader in Florida, has been elected Chairman of the Miami-Dade Democratic Party.  While this new gig is completely independent of Joe's work at NDN, we're still very excited for him, and wish him all the best in this new endeavor. 

Read more in the Miami Herald...

AP: Richardson's roots separate him from other candidates

In case you missed it, I was quoted in this AP article on how Governor Bill Richardson's Hispanic roots help separate him from the other 2008 presidential candidates, saying:

Joe Garcia, executive vice president of the nonprofit NDN, formerly known as the New Democratic Network, said Richardson is "what the new Democratic Party will look like" as it works to attract Hispanics and make inroads in the West.

"I think he offers tremendous opportunity for the growth of the party in areas where the party needs to grow," the Miami activist said.

For more information on NDN's coverage of the 2008 Presidential election, click here.

A big, big night for Al Gore

Man, could have Gore had a better night last night? What a remarkable achievement.  I'm still a little overwhelmed by what happened.  But a big, big congratulations to him and the whole Inconvenient Truth team.  For those of us in the advocacy business full time they have given us an awful lot to think about, be inspired by and to learn from. 

I was quoted in a story in Sunday's Washington Post about our former Vice President.  You can find it here.

Thoughts about Al this morning?

Bush to pressure Pakistan on Al Qaeda

One of the most critical decisions America has to make in the Middle East is how are going to manage perhaps what is now the most important regional dynamic, one created by our occupation of Iraq, the growing Sunni-Shiite tensions in the region.  We installed in Iraq the first Shiite-led Arab government in the history of the Middle East, strenghtening the region's Shiites, including Iran.  Of late our government, worried about the rise of Iran, seems to be leaning back towards the region's Sunni powers, overlooking their own "intervention" in Iraq's domestic politics and tacit support of radical Sunni groups. But in this story to run in tomorrow's Times, Bush apparently has remembered that those who attacked us on 9/11 were Sunni extremists, and that they are regrouping in Pakistan:

By DAVID E. SANGER and MARK MAZZETTI

Published: February 25, 2007

WASHINGTON, Feb. 25 — President Bush has decided to send an unusually tough message to one of his most important allies, President Pervez Musharraf of Pakistan, warning him that the newly Democratic Congress could cut aid to his country unless his forces became far more aggressive in hunting down operatives with Al Qaeda, senior administration officials say.

The decision came after the White House concluded that General Musharraf is failing to live up to commitments he made to Mr. Bush during a visit here in September. General Musharraf insisted then, both in private and public, that a peace deal he struck with tribal leaders in one of the country’s most lawless border areas would not diminish the hunt for the leaders of Al Qaeda and the Taliban or their training camps.

Now, American intelligence officials have concluded that the terrorist infrastructure is being rebuilt, and that while Pakistan has attacked some camps, its overall effort has flagged.

“He’s made a number of assurances over the past few months, but the bottom line is that what they are doing now is not working,” one senior administration official who deals often with Southeast Asia issues said late last week. “The message we’re sending to him now is that the only thing that matters is results.”

Democrats, who took control of Congress last month, have urged the White House to put greater pressure on Pakistan because of statements from American commanders that units based in Pakistan that are linked to the Taliban, Afghanistan’s ousted rulers, are increasing their attacks into Afghanistan....

Hersh on Bush's new strategy for the Middle East

A STRATEGIC SHIFT

In the past few months, as the situation in Iraq has deteriorated, the Bush Administration, in both its public diplomacy and its covert operations, has significantly shifted its Middle East strategy. The “redirection,” as some inside the White House have called the new strategy, has brought the United States closer to an open confrontation with Iran and, in parts of the region, propelled it into a widening sectarian conflict between Shiite and Sunni Muslims.

To undermine Iran, which is predominantly Shiite, the Bush Administration has decided, in effect, to reconfigure its priorities in the Middle East. In Lebanon, the Administration has coöperated with Saudi Arabia’s government, which is Sunni, in clandestine operations that are intended to weaken Hezbollah, the Shiite organization that is backed by Iran. The U.S. has also taken part in clandestine operations aimed at Iran and its ally Syria. A by-product of these activities has been the bolstering of Sunni extremist groups that espouse a militant vision of Islam and are hostile to America and sympathetic to Al Qaeda.

One contradictory aspect of the new strategy is that, in Iraq, most of the insurgent violence directed at the American military has come from Sunni forces, and not from Shiites. But, from the Administration’s perspective, the most profound—and unintended—strategic consequence of the Iraq war is the empowerment of Iran. Its President, Mahmoud Ahmadinejad, has made defiant pronouncements about the destruction of Israel and his country’s right to pursue its nuclear program, and last week its supreme religious leader, Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, said on state television that “realities in the region show that the arrogant front, headed by the U.S. and its allies, will be the principal loser in the region.”

Read on.

UN: US Iran intelligence flawed

One of the great challenges facing America in the post-Bush era will be whether the credibility loss we've suffered globally will be limited to Bush, or will permanently hamper our efforts aboard.

The LA Times has a front page story today that once again questions the credibility of the American government on a major issue of the day:  

VIENNA — Although international concern is growing about Iran's nuclear program and its regional ambitions, diplomats here say most U.S. intelligence shared with the U.N. nuclear watchdog agency has proved inaccurate and none has led to significant discoveries inside Iran.

The officials said the CIA and other Western spy services had provided sensitive information to the Vienna-based International Atomic Energy Agency at least since 2002, when Iran's long-secret nuclear program was exposed. But none of the tips about supposed secret weapons sites provided clear evidence that the Islamic Republic was developing illicit weapons.

"Since 2002, pretty much all the intelligence that's come to us has proved to be wrong," a senior diplomat at the IAEA said. Another official here described the agency's intelligence stream as "very cold now" because "so little panned out."

The reliability of U.S. information and assessments on Iran is increasingly at issue as the Bush administration confronts the emerging regional power on several fronts: its expanding nuclear effort, its alleged support for insurgents in Iraq and its backing of Middle East militant groups.

The CIA still faces harsh criticism for its prewar intelligence errors on Iraq. No one here argues that U.S. intelligence officials have fallen this time for crudely forged documents or pushed shoddy analysis. IAEA officials, who openly challenged U.S. assessments that Saddam Hussein was developing a nuclear bomb, say the Americans are much more cautious in assessing Iran.

American officials privately acknowledge that much of their evidence on Iran's nuclear plans and programs remains ambiguous, fragmented and difficult to prove.

Richardson weighs in on Iran

Governor Bill Richardson, one of America's most experienced diplomats, weighs in today with a thoughtful op-ed on Iran in the Washington Post:

The recent tentative agreement with North Korea over its nuclear program illustrates how diplomacy can work even with the most unsavory of regimes. Unfortunately, it took the Bush administration more than six years to commit to diplomacy. During that needless delay North Korea developed and tested nuclear weapons -- weapons its leaders still have not agreed to dismantle. Had we engaged the North Koreans earlier, instead of calling them "evil" and talking about "regime change," we might have prevented them from going nuclear. We could have, and should have, negotiated a better agreement, and sooner.

As the International Atomic Energy Agency just confirmed, Iran has once again defied the international community and is moving forward with its nuclear program, yet the Bush administration seems committed to repeating the mistakes it made with North Korea. Rather than directly engaging the Iranians about their nuclear program, President Bush refuses to talk, except to make threats. He has moved ships to the Persian Gulf region and claims, with scant evidence, that Iran is helping Iraqi insurgents kill Americans. This is not a strategy for peace. It is a strategy for war -- a war that Congress has not authorized. Most of our allies, and most Americans, don't believe this president, who has repeatedly cried wolf.

Saber-rattling is not a good way to get the Iranians to cooperate. But it is a good way to start a new war -- a war that would be a disaster for the Middle East, for the United States and for the world. A war that, furthermore, would destroy what little remains of U.S. credibility in the community of nations.

A better approach would be for the United States to engage directly with the Iranians and to lead a global diplomatic offensive to prevent them from building nuclear weapons. We need tough, direct negotiations, not just with Iran but also with our allies, especially Russia, to get them to support us in presenting Iran with credible carrots and sticks.

Congress Stranger Than Fiction

Having already made a name for herself for her flirtatious behavior at the State of the Union, Congresswoman Michele Bachman (R-MN) is now claiming that there is a secret agreement to partition Iraq. The Minneapolis Star-Tribune has more:

“Iran is the trouble maker, trying to tip over apple carts all over Baghdad right now because they want America to pull out. And do you know why? It’s because they’ve already decided that they’re going to partition Iraq.

And half of Iraq, the western, northern portion of Iraq, is going to be called…. the Iraq State of Islam, something like that. And I’m sorry, I don’t have the official name, but it’s meant to be the training ground for the terrorists. There’s already an agreement made.

They are going to get half of Iraq and that is going to be a terrorist safe haven zone where they can go ahead and bring about more terrorist attacks in the Middle East region and then to come against the United States because we are their avowed enemy.”

Bachmann did not say how she knew about this plan, nor with whom Iran has made this deal. 

The interview, with St. Cloud Times reporter Lawrence Schumacher, is available in its entirety as a podcast.

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